Remembering Francis John Pound

HELLO, MY UNCLE FRANCIS WAS ONE OF THE SAILORS ON THE H.M.C.S REGINA, UNFORTUNATELY HE WAS KILLED. HE HAD JUST GOTTEN OFF WATCH AND WENT BELOW. HIS NAME IS FRANCIS JOHN POUND.

I would appreciate any info you could send me, as my mom  is still alive, she was 15 when he died. they were very close and she doesn’t know much.

Francis John Pound  will be remembered…

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His service  record  file  is now  available  on  Ancestry.

Click here.

Francis  is also  remembered  here, but even more here.

Eric’s story about HMCS Regina

Page 7

Click here.

Sitting ducks.
From One Hundred Years on a Handshake by Brian Hanington, to be published in February, 2014.
When Canada joined its allies by declaring waron Germany, the reaction of most Canadians was overwhelmingly supportive. Notwithstanding a clumsy attempt by William Lyon Mackenzie King to enact conscription, the national call to arms was heeded; more than one million men and women joined Canada’s forces to defeat Germany’s bid for continental domination. A full ten percent of the nation’s population signed up. Of those, 45,000 died in battle and another 55,000 were wounded.

Link sent by John Hawley.

Excerpt

Regina came to a halt, gently rocking in the calm sea. The entire crew was shocked. All off-watch sailors had come to the upper deck to watch the sinking ofEzra Weston, and when the ship came to a dead stop they all had the same thought; Regina was now a sitting duck for attack by an enemy sub. For almost 20 minutes, they bobbed noiselessly. One of Eric’s shipmates, Able Seaman Tommy Malone, was the weapons tech on watch at the stern. Tommy knew that his depth charges—20 of which were live in their racks—were a danger. Set with hydrostatic releases to detonate at 50 feet of depth, if even one rolled off now it would kill them all. Tommy asked the bridge for permission to “set the depth charges safe” and was told to proceed. He moved quickly along the two racks of 10 charges each, deactivating each with a brass key.
Thomas De La Hunt Malone
Thomas Malone

The Memory Project: Jim Hawley

Jim Hawley’s son who has contributed a lot to this blog sent me this link.

John never misses a post on this blog.

Click here.

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It was in this message he sent Garry Weir and me.

Hi,

Please see the link below for my dad’s story (Memory Project) about his RCNVR WWII and HMCS Regina K234 experiences.

This includes some photographs, text and voice accounts.

Dad had his 88th birthday on October 26 in the Regency Manor LTCF in Port Hope Ontario.

Best Regards,

John

http://www.thememoryproject.com/stories/2240:jim-hawley/

* Note: Don McIntosh has a Memory Project article as well.

I Was One of the Three Divers…

Comment of a reader…

I was one of the three divers who located and first (??)  dived this wreck, and second down the shot line.

All 3 of us were respectful of the resting place of the brave men who perished, and deeply moved by the experience and the dive.

My first recognisable site was of the forward gun, with shell casings close at hand, reminding me of the life and death struggle that was taking place back then, although I was also shocked by the small size of the ship and how little protection it afforded the crew.

From behind the superstructure the wreck just ceased! On the seabed was a trail of large white waxy columns, festooned with anemone and “dead men’s finger” corals! These were what was left of the depth charges that Thomas Malone disabled and so saved the lives of many others.

It was an incredible opportunity to have potentially have been the first to dive the wreck, or at least to rediscover it (depending on your point of view). words are insufficient to express my gratitude for the sacrifices made by the young men that served on this ship.

A recent return dive on the Ezra Western  prompted me to remember and search for more online! I am so pleased that there is this to help us remember!

J Grey Somerset, UK

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